Month: October 2016

Live Blogging Game 1 of the NLDS (#2)

I’m live blogging game 1 of the National League Division Series between the Washington Nationals and (Claire’s) Los Angeles Dodgers. Top of the second… 5:59 p.m. – Max is stalking! 6:03 p.m. – 10 pitches…that’s the way to bounce back, Max! 6:06 p.m. – These announcers on FOX never shut up.  Leave a little “space” in the conversation, guys. 6:07 p.m. – And I’ll say it for F.P. “There goes the no hitter.”  What’s a little 3-week layoff.  Nothing for Murphy! 6:09 p.m. – Less than 10 minutes after talking about what a key Harper is for the Nationals, Harold Reynolds says Rendon and Zimmerman are the keys tonight.  How many keys can one game have? 6:12 p.m. – Okay…let’s wear out Kershaw and get him to throw a lot of pitches.  We’re going to be over 30 by the end of the second…assuming it takes Danny at least three to strike out.  Prove me wrong, K-Street. 6:14 p.m. – But he doesn’t.  Why, oh why, is Espinosa still playing? 6:15 p.m. – The Dodgers …

Live Blogging Game 1 of the NLDS (#1)

Okay.  I’ve been much too serious in recent posts here on More to Come…  So, to remedy that problem, let’s live blog Game 1 of the National League Division Series between our Washington Nationals and (Claire’s) Los Angeles Dodgers! Go Nats! I’ll be at tomorrow’s game in person, so it seemed appropriate to carry on a running conversation with readers online, just as if I were at the ballpark. I’ll post several times during the game. Thank God I missed 99% of FOX Sports 1 pre-game.  The basket of deplorables on that show (Pete Rose! A-Rod!) is just too much to bear.  But so FOX. 5:39 p.m. – First pitch strike from Max!  And we quickly have a strikeout! 5:41 p.m. – Well giving up that home run to Corey Seager didn’t take long.  (Only player who can give Trea Turner a run for his money on the “looks like he is 12 years old” scale.) Maybe Max got it out of his system early.  The gopher ball has been his problem all year long.  …

Conservation as a Creative Act

A 2011 terrorist bombing in the national government quarter of Oslo damaged two central modernist buildings and set the Norwegian government on a path of demolition and replacement that raised questions of national remembrance, security, preservation, and democratic consensus. That incident provides the context for a new and expansive work about preservation, urbanism, and architecture edited by architectural designer and scholar Bryony Roberts, the 2016 Rome Prize winner in Historic Preservation. Tabula Plena: Forms of Urban Preservation takes its title from a contrast to the familiar architectural and planning term, tabula rasa, the clean slate—a site that is cleared and thus provides the freedom for design without constraints. Preservationists in the United States know this situation all too well, from the urban renewal battles of the 1950s and 60s to today’s call for clearing urban blocks to allow new high-rise buildings that will provide more “density” in our rapidly growing cities. Roberts and students from the Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO), working in collaboration with a team of students from the Columbia University …

Religious Liberty and the Founding Myths

Growing up Baptist, I was schooled by my father of the dangers of having the government involved in religious life.  A New Deal Democrat and a staunch supporter of the separation of church and state, Daddy was a proud “Roger Williams” Baptist. So when Andrew attended Brown University in Providence, Candice and I made sure to stop at the Roger Williams National Memorial – administered by the National Park Service – where I picked up a copy of John Barry’s Roger Williams and The Creation of the American Soul and sent it to my father. Last year I began hearing Kevin Kruse, the Princeton historian and author of One Nation Under God:  How Corporate America Invented Christian America interviewed on NPR and other outlets. Intrigued, I bought that book for my father as well, thinking it would strike a chord. We talked about both works before Daddy passed away, and I wrote a piece on this blog last year about how old places can help us understand the battles for religious freedom.  When I brought both …