Day: December 11, 2016

You Can’t Stop the Revolution

Since moving to Pasadena earlier this year, Claire has been attending All Saints Episcopal Church.  Today, she sent us a text that said, “The sermon at All Saints got a standing ovation this morning…It was a feminist re-telling of the character of the Virgin Mary and how the patriarchal church has belittled her from a strong woman of color into a submissive white woman who embodies the impossible ideal of being a virgin mother.” Well, I certainly wanted to hear that! Luckily, All Saints posts their sermons on YouTube, and so I just finished listening to Mike Kinman’s sermon – the one Claire referenced – entitled You Can’t Stop the Revolution.  “Mary was the Mother of the Revolution of Love and the Magnificat is her protest chant – a protest chant the church has spent 2000 years mansplaining in an effort to silence the radical power of her proclamation.” More than once Kinman says, “God’s revolution of love will be led by fierce, nasty women.”  This is a powerful message.  Give it a listen. More …

The Well-Tempered City

Jonathan F.P. Rose is a man of many interests and talents.  A developer, Rose builds affordable housing and mixed-income community centers.  He is a jazz aficionado and – as suggested by the title of his newest book – a classical music devotee.  Rose is also an interdisciplinary scholar and writer.  In The Well-Tempered City:  What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations, and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life, Rose brings those talents and interests together in a wide-ranging and thoughtful look at the past – and future – of the places where 80% of the world’s population will live by 2080. (Full disclosure:  My employer – the National Trust for Historic Preservation – has recognized Jonathan’s work with a Preservation Honor Award, and I have worked with him through his role as an advisor to a couple of our projects.) The Well-Tempered City is a book that reflects a lifetime of work and thought about how cities best serve people.  Early in the book, Rose notes that, “Since the founding of the very …